Dye Garden

Join us Saturday, April 27, 2019 from 10am-1pm for a workday in the garden – get tips on growing your own dye plants. RSVP here.

Full Spectrum maintains a dye garden in the West Bank Community Garden on the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus next to Wilson Library. In our first season, we are growing woad (Isatis tinctoria), red amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus, komo), cosmos (Cosmos sulphureus), garden tickseed (Coreopsis tinctoria), marigold (Tagetes), zinnea (Zinnia elegans), and ironweed (Veronia gigantica). We also aim to learn about and forage for dyestuffs that grow wild in Minnesota including sumac (Rhus glabra), goldenrod (Solidago rigida), black walnut (Juglans nigra), and common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) which is invasive in this region.

Contact fullspectrum@umn.edu to learn more, help with the garden, or be the first to learn about dye workshops.

Cosmos sulphureus

Cosmos sulphureus Yellow- and orange-hued Cosmos flowers make effective dye plants. Cosmos sulphureus is native to Mexico and parts of Central America, it also grows abundantly in eastern South Africa.…

Coreopsis tinctoria

Coreopsis tinctoria Also known as Plains coreopsis or tickseed, Coreopsis tinctoria is common to the Great Plains and much of the United States. It also grows in Canada and Mexico…

Woad – Isatis tinctoria

Woad – Isatis tinctoria Woad has a high concentration of indigo in its leaves. Though not as saturated as indigo, it provided blue hues to ancient Celts and Vikings. The…

Amaranth

Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Domesticated around 4000 BCE in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico Red Amaranth has been used to dye food, beverages, and textiles for centuries. Hopi and Zuni Native…